Category Archives: IEPs – Individual Education Plans

SMART goals for IEPS

SMART Goals

Annual Goals for IEPs should be written using the SMART goal format.

 

SMART

S – Specific

M – Measurable

A – Attainable

R – Realistic / Relevant

T – Time Limited

 

Be very specific about the action. For instance: Which of the following are NOT specific?:

raise his/her hand for attention,

 -use a classroom voice,

– read the pre-primer Dolch Words,

– complete homework,

– keep hands and feet to him/herself,

–  point to 1 want, or 1 need using augmentative symbols.

S – Specific

Clearly describe the behaviour or academic goal.  i.e. will read at SRA level X by the end of semester.  Will use fidgit toys during circle time.

M – Measurable

Then decide what determines the success of the goal. For instance:

–          how many consecutive minutes will the child remain on task? How many gym periods?

–          How fluently will the child read the words – without hesitation and prompting?

–          What percentage of accuracy? How often?

T – Time limited

Then you need to provide a time frame or location/context for the goal. For instance:

–          during silent reading time, while in the gym,

–           at recess time, by the end of 2nd term,

–          point to 1 picture symbol when something is needed.

Some Examples of Not-So SMART Goals

A vague, broad or general goal is unacceptable in the IEP. Goals that state will improve reading ability, will improve his/her behaviour, will do better in math should be stated much more specifically with reading levels or benchmarks, or frequency or level of improvement to attain and a time frame for when the improvement will occur.

Using “will improve his/her behaviour ‘is also not specific. Although you may want behaviour improved, which specific behaviours are targeted first along with when and how are a critical part of the goal.

You need to clearly define the behaviour concerns to start to identify ways to improve it.

SMART tips

Keep it positive – i.e. keep hands on fidget toy in hallways NOT do not knock on classroom doors in hall

Include any curricular modifications. If the curriculum states that the goal is to count to 50 and you state count to 10, this is a modification.

Include any curricular accommodations. This will include things like: scribing, a quite setting to take tests, assistive technology etc.

Provide any support staff that will be involved in the IEP

Indicate materials and or resources to be used

Most importantly, make sure the IEP is based on priorities for the student.

IEP Samples

http://www.ontariodirectors.ca/IEP-PEI/en.html

ACTIVITY A

1.            Explore the sample IEPs and discuss.  Can you identify the SMART goals?  Create a student profile based on one IEP.

Remember – SMART

  • S – Specific
  • M – Measurable
  • A – Attainable
  • R – Realistic / Relevant
  • T – Time Limited

 

2.            In your groups role play what 5 minutes of this student’s day would look like in their classroom.

Student Profile

Include:

  • Name, age, grade, strengths, needs
  • Key areas of academic focus/need
  • Brief biographic sketch (who is this person really?)

Transition Plan

Note: IEPs for students with ASD must have a transition plan.  This is part of PPM 140

Also, for all Exceptional students (except Gifted) a transition plan is required for transition from Elementary to Secondary and from Secondary to Post-Secondary (work, community resources, education, apprenticeships etc…)

 

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Paperwork 101

Special Education is filled with paperwork.  Each board (and each school!) will have their own way of approaching paperwork such as IPRC referrals, IEPs, In-School Team meetings, etc…

Here are some resources to get you started:

The Toolkit 2003 is a collection of testing materials for use in Lakehead Public Schools. This resource was developed to meet the needs of school facilitators. (Look for the Adobe file at the bottom of the page – download this before it’s gone!)

The Toolkit is an excellent resource for Special Education Teachers in all areas – content includes: skill and behaviour checklists, Dolch word lists, the Slosson Oral Reading Test, Auditory Discrimination Test, DRA & Running Records, Math Analysis, Information about Standardised Assessent (Mean, Median, Mode), Types of Standardised Assessments and scoring info, and finally samples of forms for Special Ed paperwork (IPRC referrals, etc…)

Also, be sure to read:

Individual Education Plans (IEP) Samples: Resources to Support the Development and Implementation of Effective IEPs in Ontario

http://www.ontariodirectors.ca/IEP-PEI/en.html

IEP Checklist http://www.peopleforeducation.com/adx/aspx/adxGetMedia.aspx?DocID=865

 

The Individual Education Plan (IEP) A Resource Guide (2004)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/guide/resource/iepresguid.pdf

Finally,

The Special Education Companion, 2002

Possibly the BEST and most under-used document in Special Education!  This document lists countless ways to help students under each Exceptionality Category.  If you look at ‘Gifted’ you have 10 pages of characterisitics of gifted students, issues, general teaching and learning strategies, program ideas, subject-specific strategies (reading, spelling, mathematics) and assessment strategies!

Do NOT write an IEP without reading this document! Parents and Teachers should use this resource to determine appropriate accommodations, modifications, and strategies for the classroom.  Parents, please bring this to your teacher meetings to advocate for your child! http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/ocup/documents/speced2002.pdf

Note: This is a PERSONAL blog, not an official Ministry of Education website. This is a forum for sharing.

Please add comments and your favourite resources (and let me know if there are any dead links!) Thank you!

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Filed under IEPs - Individual Education Plans, Ontario Ministry of Education Policy Documents

IEPs – Individual Education Plans

Want to read an IEP?

Check the sample IEPs at http://www.ontariodirectors.ca/IEP-PEI/en.html  There are examples for every category of Exceptionality and in both the Elementary and Secondary panel.

Books on IEPs, the Identification and IEP-writing process and Programming ideas:

Bateman, B.D. & Herr, C.M. (2006) Writing Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives 2nd Edition, Attainment Company, USA

ETFO Special Education Handbook: A Practical Guide for All Teachers (you can buy it on ETFO’s website http://www.etfo.ca/Pages/default.aspx – consider it money well spent)

Special Education, a Guide for Educators, 2001

This is my all-time favorite document that provides an easy-to-read overview of the Special Education System in Ontario.  Includes categories of Exceptionalities, Funding, IPRC and IEP info as well as funding and appeal information.  A must read! http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/guide.html

Now you’re ready to write an IEP.  Here are some important documents to have on hand:

Individual Education Plans (IEP) Samples: Resources to Support the Development and Implementation of Effective IEPs in Ontario http://www.ontariodirectors.ca/IEP-PEI/en.html

IEP Checklist http://www.peopleforeducation.com/adx/aspx/adxGetMedia.aspx?DocID=865

The Individual Education Plan (IEP) A Resource Guide (2004)

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/guide/resource/iepresguid.pdf

Special Education Companion (Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner) Still the best list of accommodations and modifications that are specific to an Exceptionality available.

http://www.ocup.org/resources/documents/companions/speced2002.pdf

Transition Planning: A Resource Guide

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/transiti.html

The Special Education Companion, 2002

(aka Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner) Still the best list of accommodations and modifications that are specific to an Exceptionality available.

Possibly the BEST and most under-used document in Special Education!  This document lists countless ways to help students under each Exceptionality Category.  If you look at ‘Gifted’ you have 10 pages of characterisitics of gifted students, issues, general teaching and learning strategies, program ideas, subject-specific strategies (reading, spelling, mathematics) and assessment strategies!

Do NOT write an IEP without reading this document! Parents and Teachers should use this resource to determine appropriate accommodations, modifications, and strategies for the classroom.  Parents, please bring this to your teacher meetings to advocate for your child!

http://www.ocup.org/resources/documents/companions/speced2002.pdf

 

(PS. The Special Education Companion is listed twice on this page for a reason – check it out!)

Note: This is a PERSONAL blog, not an official Ministry of Education website.  This is a forum for sharing. 

Please add comments and your favourite resources (and let me know if there are any dead links!)  Thank you!

Leave a comment

Filed under How to Teach Students with Special Needs, IEPs - Individual Education Plans