Future Horizons – In-Sync Activity Cards

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I am very excited to have partnered with Future Horizons, Inc. and Sensory World, leaders in providing information and resources about Sensory Processing Disorder, Autism and Asperger Syndrome.  I recently received a set of In-Sync Activity Cards and was thrilled to try them out.  When I first looked at the cards I was glad to see the sensory activities required very minimal or no ‘equipment.’  My favorite activity only requires a paper plate!

The activity cards are developed by Joye Newman, MA and Carol Kranowitz, MA.  Joye Newman is perceptual motor therapist and the founder and director of Kids Moving Company.  Carol Kranowitz is the author of the classics Out of Sync Child and Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun. The In-Sync Activity Cards are based on their book Growing an In-Synch Child: Simple, Fun Activities to Help Every Child Develop, Learn and Grow.

I was impressed with the range of activities and how they can be adapted and extended depending on the individual’s needs.  50 different activities are organized according to beginner, intermediate and advanced levels.  The activity cards give ‘What to Look Fors’ and clearly describes the sensory systems and skills are targeted.

For example, ‘Wall Ball’ involves moving a tennis ball with your hands at shoulder height across a masking taped line on a wall.  The materials are only masking tape, a tennis ball and a wall.  The skills you develop are “directionality (for writing in cursive), proprioception (for squeezing paint out of a tube), tactile processing (for handling classroom tools, such as scissors and crayons) and visual processing (for writing on lined paper).” (Quoted from activity card)

As a special education teacher for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder I found the activities to be very easy to use in the classroom.  As the instructional leader in my classroom, I work with different teaching assistants and volunteers.  The easy-to-follow instructions of the cards make the activities possible for support staff to lead students through with minimal direction on my part.  The activities are quick, easy to do, and very easy to teach to students and staff alike.

One of our classroom program goals is to promote greater independence and active involvement in daily living tasks.  I find many of my students do not have a sense of their bodies or limbs in space, and are ‘reluctant movers’.

Many activities (such as Slippery Slidey’, where a student slides a paper plate on the ground with their foot), provide visual support for the individual to attempt the movement (i.e. ‘move the plate to the front’).  Some of my students progressed from simply dragging their toe on the ground to actually pressing weight on their foot while maintaining a ‘flat foot’ in order to move the paper plate!

As a parent of children with sensory processing issues (one hyposensitive and one with full sensory processing disorder) I really appreciate that these activities can be easily done at home.  Some, such as creating a ‘Car Wash’ are just fun ideas that any child would love.  The bonus is that doing the activities helps develop sensory and perceptual skills.

Discount Opportunity:

As a reader you have opportunity to receive a 15% discount and FREE shipping in Continental U.S. on most purchases on Future Horizons website, including conferences!  You also have the opportunity to receive 15% off shipping on Sensory World site.  Just use the coupon code HALFPAST in checking out.

You can purchase the In-Sync Activity Cards directly though Sensory World and save 15% by using the coupon code HALFPAST at check out.

Disclaimer

I was sent a few books and a set of In-Synch Activity Cards resource for review. All opinions are my own.  I will be posting reviews of the books shortly.  If you purchase items using the coupon code HALFPAST through Sensory World or Future Horizons I will receive a small percentage of the purchase amount. 

But the bottom line is these are amazing resources from an excellent provider.  Be sure to check them out!   

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Filed under Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)

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